The 3D Chinese head and face modeling
The 3D Chinese head and face modeling Online event Book
Fri Apr 01, 2022 at 01:00 AM to Sat Apr 08, 2023 at 02:00 AM Add to my calendar
Timezone : Europe/Paris
2022-04-01 01:00:00 2023-04-08 02:00:00 Europe/Paris The 3D Chinese head and face modeling Reservations on : https://www.billetweb.fr/the-3d-chinese-head-and-face-modeling -- Product designers have long strived to create products that are a perfect match for their customers. In 3D product design, designers often rely on conventional anthropometric measures. This causes several fitting issues when dealing with the intricacies of human body forms, which is a regular occurrence. Recently developed 3D anthropometric surveys have opened the door to the possibility of doing extensive shape analysis on a human model based on the collection of 3D scan data. The approach for constructing a homologous 3D head and face model was presented in this research using 3D point cloud data from the SizeChina survey. In order to construct the model, anatomical and virtual landmarks, as well as a surface modelling approach based on point cloud data, were used. For all scans, the head and face models had the same number of vertices and had the same set of characteristics. There were noticeable discrepancies between male and female models among the typical Chinese models. Primary component analysis was used to examine the variations in head and face shapes across persons, and the findings revealed that the most significant differences between individuals were in overall size, particularly in breadth and depth. However, while defining the 3D form of the face, the height of the face, the width of the forehead, the rear of the head, the chin, and the region around the jaw were all crucial considerations. The findings of this research may be relevant in the development of cosmetic products for the head and face. The human head and face include a variety of vital organs and sensors, including the brain, eyes, nose, mouth, and ears, which are all responsible for life support and data processing. Many medical and information display equipment are meant to be worn on the head and face, including helmets and face shields. The investigation of anthropometric differences in people's heads and faces is not a new field of study. Numerical dimensions are used in traditional anthropometry to characterise the form and offer design references for products. Calipers and tapes are routinely used to take measures directly on human heads and faces, and photography is also often used to take measurements . A recent examination of the head and face of Chinese employees employed facial measurements acquired using conventional approaches for the purpose of designing a respirator for the workers. Manual measurements, on the other hand, have a number of disadvantages, including lengthy processes and poor dependability. More crucially, the numerical measurements do not meet the requirements of modern product design practise, which calls for a more complicated geometry of the human head and face to be used. Motorcycle helmets, headmounted displays, and surgical masks, among other health and safety goods, need a very exact fit between the product's form and the surface of the human head and face [9]. Product designers are going into complicated surface and curve creation throughout the design process because to the introduction of computer-aided design tools such as Alias and Rhino. Specifically, these designers want a precise portrayal of the human head and face, including not just the average form, but also the differences between individuals. For the manufacturing business, a precise and complete 3D human head and face model is required in order to build better-fitting and safer goods.Because of the rapid growth of computer technology in recent years, 3D Modeling Services of the human body has made significant strides in recent years. In the simulation and animation fields, new techniques are being deployed more and more often in order to generate adaptable and realistic human models. Parametrized human body or head models have been created by several researchers using feature-based models or landmark-free models. Reconstruction of 3D human skulls was accomplished by the use of the non-uniform rational Bsplines (NURBS) approach. There have also been other approaches of fitting a template or generic model to scan data that have been presented. They did not, however, define the accuracy of the model, and the procedures were deemed to be comparably complicated. The majority of these approaches did not have the goal of creating a parametric model for anthropometric analysis. As a result, the 3D characteristics of one individual may not be identical to those of another in every aspect. Consequently, the model could not be employed for statistical analysis in this situation." Furthermore, the majority of these research were based on a small number of human scans and did not provide statistically significant findings.As a result, the models were unable to accurately capture population variances.A 3D model of the face was built by other researchers  based on landmarks in order to study the face shape and evaluate the fit of spectacle frames. The homologous shape modelling approach  was used, and the resulting model offered consistent statistical shape information about the objects.However, because of the digitising process utilised, this model was solely intended for use in testing spectacle frames and did not include any 3D elements. - Tech
Product designers have long strived to create products that are a perfect match for their customers. In 3D product design, designers often rely on conventional anthropometric measures. This causes several fitting issues when dealing with the intricacies of human body forms, which is a regular occurrence. Recently developed 3D anthropometric surveys have opened the door to the possibility of doing extensive shape analysis on a human model based on the collection of 3D scan data. The approach for constructing a homologous 3D head and face model was presented in this research using 3D point cloud data from the SizeChina survey. In order to construct the model, anatomical and virtual landmarks, as well as a surface modelling approach based on point cloud data, were used. For all scans, the head and face models had the same number of vertices and had the same set of characteristics. There were noticeable discrepancies between male and female models among the typical Chinese models. Primary component analysis was used to examine the variations in head and face shapes across persons, and the findings revealed that the most significant differences between individuals were in overall size, particularly in breadth and depth. However, while defining the 3D form of the face, the height of the face, the width of the forehead, the rear of the head, the chin, and the region around the jaw were all crucial considerations. The findings of this research may be relevant in the development of cosmetic products for the head and face. The human head and face include a variety of vital organs and sensors, including the brain, eyes, nose, mouth, and ears, which are all responsible for life support and data processing. Many medical and information display equipment are meant to be worn on the head and face, including helmets and face shields. The investigation of anthropometric differences in people's heads and faces is not a new field of study. Numerical dimensions are used in traditional anthropometry to characterise the form and offer design references for products. Calipers and tapes are routinely used to take measures directly on human heads and faces, and photography is also often used to take measurements . A recent examination of the head and face of Chinese employees employed facial measurements acquired using conventional approaches for the purpose of designing a respirator for the workers. Manual measurements, on the other hand, have a number of disadvantages, including lengthy processes and poor dependability. More crucially, the numerical measurements do not meet the requirements of modern product design practise, which calls for a more complicated geometry of the human head and face to be used. Motorcycle helmets, headmounted displays, and surgical masks, among other health and safety goods, need a very exact fit between the product's form and the surface of the human head and face [9]. Product designers are going into complicated surface and curve creation throughout the design process because to the introduction of computer-aided design tools such as Alias and Rhino. Specifically, these designers want a precise portrayal of the human head and face, including not just the average form, but also the differences between individuals. For the manufacturing business, a precise and complete 3D human head and face model is required in order to build better-fitting and safer goods.
Because of the rapid growth of computer technology in recent years, 3D Modeling Services of the human body has made significant strides in recent years. In the simulation and animation fields, new techniques are being deployed more and more often in order to generate adaptable and realistic human models. Parametrized human body or head models have been created by several researchers using feature-based models or landmark-free models. Reconstruction of 3D human skulls was accomplished by the use of the non-uniform rational Bsplines (NURBS) approach. There have also been other approaches of fitting a template or generic model to scan data that have been presented. They did not, however, define the accuracy of the model, and the procedures were deemed to be comparably complicated. The majority of these approaches did not have the goal of creating a parametric model for anthropometric analysis. As a result, the 3D characteristics of one individual may not be identical to those of another in every aspect. Consequently, the model could not be employed for statistical analysis in this situation." Furthermore, the majority of these research were based on a small number of human scans and did not provide statistically significant findings.
As a result, the models were unable to accurately capture population variances.
A 3D model of the face was built by other researchers  based on landmarks in order to study the face shape and evaluate the fit of spectacle frames. The homologous shape modelling approach  was used, and the resulting model offered consistent statistical shape information about the objects.
However, because of the digitising process utilised, this model was solely intended for use in testing spectacle frames and did not include any 3D elements.
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